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Ethical Porn

Great discussion: Well done CSPH

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The problem that needs to be fixed is not kick all the girls out of YA, it’s teach boys that stories featuring female protagonists or written by female authors also apply to them. Boys fall in love. Boys want to be important. Boys have hopes and fears and dreams and ambitions. What boys also have is a sexist society in which they are belittled for “liking girl stuff.” Male is neutral, female is specific.

I heard someone mention that Sarah Rees Brennan’s THE DEMON’S LEXICON would be great for boys, but they’d never read it with that cover. Friends, then the problem is NOT with the book. It’s with the society that’s raising that boy. It’s with the community who inculcated that boy with the idea that he can’t read a book with an attractive guy on the cover.

Here’s how we solve the OMG SO MANY GIRLS IN YA problem: quit treating women like secondary appendages. Quit treating women’s art like it’s a niche, novelty creation only for girls. Quit teaching boys to fear the feminine, quit insisting that it’s a hardship for men to have to relate to anything that doesn’t specifically cater to them.

Because if I can watch Raiders of the Lost Ark and want to grow up to be an archaeologist, there’s no reason at all that a boy shouldn’t be able to read THE DEMON’S LEXICON with its cover on. My friends, sexism doesn’t just hurt women, and our young men’s abysmal rate of attraction to literacy is the proof of it.

If you want to fix the male literary crisis, here’s your solution:

Become a feminist.

-

The Problem is Not the Books, Saundra Mitchell (via silverstags)

OMG THIS THIS THIS THIS!!!!!

(via lez-brarian)

Aw fuck yeah!

(via yeahwriters)

Genital Herpes

I have been getting a few questions about Genital Herpes lately. Here is what Brook in the UK says:

Genital Herpes

Genital herpes is a common viral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. New cases of genital herpes are most common among women and men over 20.

Genital herpes is passed from one person to another through unprotected vaginal sex, anal sex or oral sex (kissing, licking or sucking someone’s genitals). It can also be passed on through close genital contact (when the skin touches).

An initial outbreak of genital herpes may be followed by the virus being inactive in the body for a while before becoming active again and causing a further outbreaks, also called  ‘recurrent outbreaks’.

How to recognise it

Symptoms of herpes simplex are usually tingling or itching on or around the genital area followed by the appearance of small, painful blisters. Other symptoms include general flu-like symptoms such as headache, backache or a temperature and burning sensation when passing urine.

The Herpes virus is at its most infectious just before, during or just after an outbreak, when blisters or sores are present.

However, lots of people who have the virus but don’t show any symptoms, and Herpes can only be diagnosed when someone is showing signs of the virus.

How it’s treated

As yet no cure is available for genital herpes, but an anti-viral drug (Aciclovir) can reduce the severity of the first and recurrent episodes as well as the length of the first episode. It is important to get treatment as soon as possible for it to have an effect on symptoms.

Most people will only have one or two outbreaks of genital herpes but some may have more regular recurrences.

I reckon this is pretty cool

Jul 9

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Jul 9

Surprise, Study Confirms Hiring Discrimination Against LGBT People Is Real

autostraddle:

Surprise, Study Confirms Hiring Discrimination Against LGBT People Is Real

The Equal Rights Center has found — perhaps unsurprisingly, but nonetheless, depressingly — that people who indicate that they have worked for LGBT causes on their resumes are 23% less likely to…

Jul 8

We might as well make up our minds that chastity is no more a virtue than malnutrition

- Dr Alex Comfort The Joy of Sex (1986)

Jul 7

threewords-imthedoctor:

Amazing posters from the Australian Human Rights Commission’s “Know the Line” campaign which aims to prevent and reduce the harm of sexual harassment in Australian workplaces. 

Check their page out at https://knowtheline.humanrights.gov.au/ 

Jul 7
thecsph:

icecreamsuxx:

drew this today. 

End street harassment! 
"Street harassment is a form of sexual harassment that takes place in public spaces. At its core is a power dynamic that constantly reminds historically subordinated groups (women and LGBTQ folks, for example) of their vulnerability to assault in public spaces. Further, it reinforces the ubiquitous sexual objectification of these groups in everyday life. Street harassment can be sexist, racist, transphobic, homophobic, ableist, sizeist and/or classist.  It is an expression of the interlocking and overlapping oppressions we face and it functions as a means to silence our voices and “keep us in our place.” - See more at ihollaback.org

thecsph:

icecreamsuxx:

drew this today. 

End street harassment! 

"Street harassment is a form of sexual harassment that takes place in public spaces. At its core is a power dynamic that constantly reminds historically subordinated groups (women and LGBTQ folks, for example) of their vulnerability to assault in public spaces. Further, it reinforces the ubiquitous sexual objectification of these groups in everyday life. Street harassment can be sexist, racist, transphobic, homophobic, ableist, sizeist and/or classist.  It is an expression of the interlocking and overlapping oppressions we face and it functions as a means to silence our voices and “keep us in our place.” - See more at ihollaback.org

Jul 7
thecsph:

sexologist:

#sexedlife #fellatio101 #blowjobFAQs #postitnotes

“If you’re doing something that hurts, I want you to stop and realize that sex should feel good. Just because you start a behavior doesn’t mean you have to end a behavior.” —Megan Andelloux

thecsph:

sexologist:

#sexedlife #fellatio101 #blowjobFAQs #postitnotes

“If you’re doing something that hurts, I want you to stop and realize that sex should feel good. Just because you start a behavior doesn’t mean you have to end a behavior.” —Megan Andelloux